Let us be still…

by Winter on June 6, 2017

“To the rationally minded the mental processes of the intuitive appear to work backward. Conclusions are reached before the premises.”
~Frances Wickes: the Inner World of Childhood

Many of us have grown up in a culture where we think of our doctors as “God.” They were, and for the most part still are, the experts when it comes to healing—helping us get well from whatever malady we might have. (The doctors also seem to believe they are gods, after all, haven’t they spent time and money for a career in the top tier of our society?)

It is my opinion that we are the only expert when it comes to our body. Until we added Medical Intuition to the physical assessment class at Brown University there was (to my knowledge) no other school where intuition was consciously being incorporated into the study of allopathic medicine.

Running frightening close to our doctor/god model are pharmaceuticals being the road to health.  From the amount of advertising we see in the media, we may soon not need doctors at all.  “Just call your doctor and tell him you want x,y,z for the new disease we have just told you that you have.”

Of course, the pharmaceutical field, for a very large part, doesn’t research drug interactions. Over the years many of the health problems clients have brought to me have been a result of drug interactions. My first experience with this was scanning a young man who was dying. In my scan I sensed he was on too many antibiotics which were counteracting each other. We had to find a way to tell his doctor our suspicions, without saying a Medical Intuitive said, “The problem is too many drugs.”

In the end, I suggested that his fiancee tell his doctor that she had a dream. In the dream, his antibiotics were working against each other. She did. They deleted all but one antibiotic and the young man recovered.

What we put into our body is so important to our health and yet, nutrition is barely a footnote in most medical schools. I have given a lot of thought as to why we don’t use foods that thin the blood (and there are many) and prescribe them for thinning blood instead of prescription drug thinners with numerous side effects. It is usually the elderly who have heart problems and take a blood thinner. It is usually the elderly who fall, break bones, contract pneumonia and die. The blood thinner Coumadin works by blocking Vitamin K, which the body needs to build strong bones. So who does one listen to, the Cardiologist who wants to prevent a stroke, the Orthopedic Surgeon who wants his patient to have strong bones, or your body?

What better place to corporate our intuition than by using it to be/stay healthy? Intuition is not opposed to reason, but compliments reason. It is not uncommon for an intuitive flash to occur after you have worked hard on a problem or project, possibly to exhaustion. Research can only get so far without the use of intuition. Artists, authors, musicians use their intuition to know when something is “right” or complete. Our bodies know what is needed, if we listen.

When we take responsibility for designing our own health and our own life we are constantly called upon to make choices without knowing what the outcome will be. We simply “trust” that a door that has opened and it is one we must step through, or be forever wondering “If only I had….”. Major decisions are seldom rational, and decisions based solely on reason may not be desirable.

If I had based many (perhaps all) of the major decisions in my life on logic, I certainly wouldn’t be where I am today. Numerous, life-changing events in my life occurred around a “felt sense” for change. One that I remember well was deciding, in the middle of my junior year of college, that I was going to change schools. There was no logic for this decision, in fact logic would have suggested that I stay where I was.

In fact, I still remember the moment I decided that I was going to leave Maryville College. It was the end of the fall semester and, in typical fashion, I had cleaned my room, and everything in sigh, supposedly in preparation for studying. Opening my book, the thought popped into my head, “I’m leaving here. I’m going to transfer.” To be honest, I didn’t have a clue where I was going. In that moment I set something in motion that had been unconsciously tugging at me for quite a while.

From being a big fish in a small pond I went to being a tiny, tiny fish in the ocean. I switched from being a Music major at a small, religious institution (with 1200 + – students), to being a Psychology major at a huge university where there were 56,000 on campus.

And in the long run, what difference did it make? Maybe none in the academic scheme of things, the smaller college was prestigious. But in terms of happiness, I was much happier at the larger U.

That may have been my introduction into “life happens.” I can’t chase it, all I can do is be open to it. ( It’s that “Outrageous Openness” idea again.)

We live in a world where it is easier to pop a pill than to sit quietly, reflecting on our internal process.

When I am patiently really relaxed, not desiring anything, not searching for the meaning of life, or that “peak experience,” life (and miracles) happens.

Regardless of how I might think life works: it’s random, I co-create it, or it’s by Divine Design, I have no doubt that intuition plays a significant role in the outcome.

Somewhere along the way I discovered that intuition does not evaluate, rather it gives possibilities and provides insight into the nature of things. It is not a substitute for, but a compliment to critical thinking and moral evaluation.

In a world that seems to have no common sense, no critical thinking, and no moral evaluation, let us be still, forgetting everything we think we have heard; remembering how much we do not know. Let us discover, perhaps for the first time, our inner wisdom, our intuition.

{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Maie Liiv June 6, 2017 at 8:26 pm

I’m in Canada. A young man, 32, is in Borneo. He used to be a math prodigy and was a scholarship PhD student in math. We met on line!
He states he has been depressed for years and was taking 5 antidepressants and anti psychotics. They were not helping and he was given 6 rounds of bilateral electroshock. He has lost his memory and the ability to add even 2 single digit numbers. He is about to lose his scholarship. He states he is suicidal. I put his 5 drugs through the Interaction Feature of the website http://www.RxISK.org and found that two of the drugs were lethal in combination and the others were harmful in combination. I told him to take the RxISK printout to his psychiatrist who promptly took him off two of the meds – one he discontinued by himself. (This cold turkey withdrawal is dangerous but he seems better for it.) A long way to go.

I think the only option is orthomolecular medicine/psychiatry. NOT DRUGS. Orthomolecular psychiatrist Abram Hoffer treated more than 5000 schizophrenics with diet, micronutrients and not pharmaceuticals – he was able to restore most of them to health.

My opinion of cardiology is almost as bad as my opinion of psychiatry. I’ve opted to keep my husband on Coumadin/warfarin until his atrial fibrillation is completely resolved – and it’s resolving because of magnesium and electrolytes and not because of the dozen or so heart meds which only damaged his heart. He gets a vitamin D vitamin K combo.

And, yes, it’s difficult to stand before two glowering cardiologists trying to explain that they are wrong because of info I received in a dream. And indeed, his dangerous drug combo was found to be stopping his heart – and it was changed to a more damaging combo. Wait until I tell them he’s not taking any of their drugs. They assured me 13 years ago that he would not live for long – and they set out to prove that he wouldn’t. Book in the works. Your course next year.

Good to get to know you a little more. All the best, Maie

Reply

Maie Liiv June 6, 2017 at 8:40 pm

This article just arrived – protect your eyes from drug side effects.
http://www.wellnessresources.com/health/articles/protect_your_eyes_from_drug_side_effects/ YIKES.

It might have been you who found that my husband’s cataracts were caused by one of his heart meds.

Reply

Peggy Sullivan June 6, 2017 at 10:50 pm

Winter,
I wholeheartedly agree with the idea of listening to your body. After having worked with Hospice patients who were routinely removed from all meds save those for pain and symptom management I noted “miraculous” recoveries. This to me is proof positive that pills are not the answer and in many cases cause more harm than good.

Miss you,
Peggy

Reply

Sandie June 6, 2017 at 11:17 pm

Perfect timing- I know others who are struggling to follow their heart medically and having to fight the medical world. Sad really, as it then takes so much extra strength to move forward. Those you felt were part of your support system fade away.

Reply

Winter July 18, 2017 at 10:35 pm

So true, but there are others out there, wading through the medical world!

Reply

Peter Borkoski June 7, 2017 at 2:17 am

What approaches can I use to deal with losing memory/alzheimers?

Reply

Winter August 30, 2017 at 5:55 pm

Peter, did you check out Lew Liems’ VieLight Neuro? They are having very positive results with their research on Alzheimers with it.

Reply

Savitri Bess August 5, 2017 at 8:19 am

Winter! This is absolutely brilliant. The truth to the point and subtle, but mostly subtle in a way that is right on, saying it as it is. Gentle and strong. A badly needed essay. Thank you!!!
Lots of Love,
Savitri

Reply

Winter August 5, 2017 at 7:26 pm

Again, I thank you. I am truly blessed to have support such as yours in my life/circle of friends. XOX

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post: